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MBIRA (new production 2019)

by ROBERTO CASTELLO

25/06/2019 SPAM!, Porcari (LU-IT)
29/06/2019 Festival Diffusioni, Terranuova Bracciolini (AR-IT)
03/07/19 Insolito Festival, Parma (IT)
05/07/19 Vignale Monferrato Festival, Vignale Monferrato (AL-IT)
03/08/2019 Anghiari (AR-IT)
08/08/2019 Festival itinerante Notte della Taranta, Acaya (LE-IT)
11/08/2019 Barga Jazz, Barga (LU)
25-26-27/10/19 Teatro della Cooperativa, Milano (IT)
1-2-3/11/19 Cinema Palazzo e Hangar 238, Roma (IT)
4/11/19 Teatro Biblioteca Quarticciolo, Roma
9/11/2019 SpinTime, Roma (IT)
19/12/2019 Teatro Toselli, Cuneo (IT)
21/12/2019 Cantieri Teatrali Koreja, Lecce (IT)
 

PROMO VIDEO: https://vimeo.com/363406699

 

current repertory

choreography and direction ROBERTO CASTELLO

music MARCO ZANOTTI, ZAM MOUSTAPHA DEMBÉLÉ

text RENATO SARTI / ROBERTO CASTELLO in collaboration with ANDREA COSENTINO

performers ILENIA ROMANO, GISELDA RANIERI / SUSANNAH IHEME (dance/voice), MARCO ZANOTTI (percussions, limba) ZAM MOUSTAPHA DEMBÉLÉ (kora, tamanì, voice, balafon), ROBERTO CASTELLO

production ALDES - Teatro della Cooperativa

with the support of MIBAC / Direzione Generale Spettacolo dal vivo, REGIONE TOSCANA / Sistema Regionale dello Spettacolo

media partner NIGRIZIA

How much did Africa contribute to make us who we are?
For many centuries Europeans and Arabs have explored, colonized and converted every single corner of the planet. Today many cultures have been lost and the western culture has become, in many ways, the universal reference point. It’s impossible to say whether this is a positive or a negative, or if the colonized people used to be happier before colonization. It’s a fact that the world is getting smaller and less varied, full of TVs that broadcast the same programs and identical shops that sell identical products, from Greenland to Terra del Fuego, from California to Madrid, Riyad or Tokyo. But it often happens, in the colonization process, that the colonist changes irreversibly once he gets in contact with the conquered’s culture. This is what Mbira attempts to talk about; a concert for squares and theatres in which two dancers, two musicians and a director – through music, dance and words – try to address the complex relationship between our own and the African culture.
Mbira is the name of a musical instrument from Zimbabwe, but also the name of the traditional music made with this instrument, and “Bira” is the name of an important traditional celebration of the Shona people, the main ethnic community in Zimbabwe, in which people dance and sing to the sound of the Mbira. Mbira is also the title of a musical composition created in 1981, around which a harsh legal controversy has arisen, an issue that represents well the complex and problematic nature of the cultural and moral tangle characterizing the relationship between Africa and Europe.
Mbira is, in short, a word around which a surprising variety of stories, music, dances, celebrations and reflections about art and culture intertwine.

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